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Accumulation by Dispossession, Solidarity in Precarity and the Future of Higher Education…

…A Quick Manifesto  by a group of Anthropology and Global Studies students at the University of Sussex As both consumers of knowledge capital, and investors in our own education, we thought it might be useful to bring to your attention the concept of accumulation by dispossession, the precarity it entails both in academia and in the rest […]

Anthropologists on the Strike

Yesterday, lecturers began 14 days of strikes in over 60 universities across the United Kingdom. Nominally, the strikes are to oppose pension changes proposed by university employers that would end defined benefits and offload the risk of pension income onto lecturers themselves. Here at Culture & Capitalism, we will round up writing and interviews from anthropologists on the […]

Union revitalisation and women workers at the intersection of gender and class

by Hannah Loosley **A version of this post was published at ecnmy.org.** Women working in care, catering, cleaning, cashier and clerical jobs (the 5 Cs) have long been neglected in trade unions and politics. Their jobs are seen as ‘extras’ – helping other people be fed and cared for, so they can do their ‘proper’ […]

Deliveroo Riders Aren’t Workers, Says London Tribunal

by Rebecca Prentice In a surprise setback for trade unions attempting to organise the ‘gig’ economy, a London tribunal has ruled that Deliveroo riders are self-employed contractors, not ‘workers.’ This means that the riders do not have basic rights to minimum wage, holiday pay, and health and safety protections. They also have no right to […]

When buildings burn, from London to Dhaka

by Rebecca Prentice There is for me a sad familiarity in the story of the Grenfell Tower fire. I have spent recent years researching garment factory fires and collapses in Bangladesh. Large-scale fires, no matter where they are, have a recursive quality to them. There is always the story of the spark that begins it, […]

‘Volunteer Humanitarianism’ in the Jungle of Calais

by Elisa Sandri This article is dedicated to the memory of Giulio Regeni, PhD researcher, and to his family, whom I never met but I hope they’ll find peace and justice. Calais, a quiet town in the North West of France overlooking the Strait of Dover, caught international public attention last year for the fast […]

Crossing the Border

by Iris Ruyu Lin When I returned to the U.K. from Norway on 15th of January, it was my first trip back to the country since moving to Brighton in September. I felt at ease, waiting in the queue with other seemingly anxious first-time tourists, with my U.K.-issued Biometric Residence Permit (BRP) in my bag. […]