Category Labour

The Rail Strikes: The Unheard Voices of Train Drivers

  by Kate Longland **A shorter version was published 24 January 2017 at http://www.ecnmy.org/engage/asked-southern-rail-drivers-theyre-strike/** The Southern rail strikes have been quite a hot topic in the news due to the impact that delayed and cancelled Southern trains are having on those who travel by train, particularly commuters. The strikes were called by ASLEF, the train […]

From the Field: American Textile Mill

by Caitrin Lynch **Originally published on The Standard-Times and on SouthCoastToday.com.** In response to calls for increased empathy after the divisive national election, many Americans will be making New Year’s resolutions in 2017 to experience life from the ‘other’ side. For all of 2016, I shelved my college professor routine and went to work in a textile mill. […]

On capitalist utopia and the rightful share

by Deniz Seebacher & Julia Büchele The title of James Ferguson’s latest book (2015) draws from (arguably) “the world’s most widely circulated development cliché”: Give a man a fish, and you feed him for a day. Teach a man to fish, and you feed him for a lifetime. Contrary to the widespread assumption that most of […]

Review: The True Cost

by Rebecca Prentice **Originally published in Anthropology of Work Review (2016).** The global fashion industry is worth more than two trillion dollars, creating jobs, economic growth, tax earnings, and the products we wear every day. For consumers in the global North, the price of clothing has dropped steadily for two decades. But what does the industry […]

Beyoncé’s Anthropology of Labour

by Rebecca Prentice Last Sunday, the headline screamed: “Exposed: Sweatshop ‘Slaves’ Earning Just 44p an Hour Making ‘Empowering’ Beyoncé Clobber.” British tabloid newspaper The Sun claimed that Beyoncé Knowles’ activewear clothing line, Ivy Park (with Topshop), was made in Sri Lankan sweatshops, where workers earn just £4.30 ($6.19) a day. Copycat news articles soon followed:  “Beyoncé’s […]

Remembering Rana Plaza

by Rebecca Prentice It’s been three years since the most deadly disaster in garment manufacturing history: the April 24, 2013 collapse of the Rana Plaza garment factory building in Dhaka. To mark the anniversary I am reposting a 2014 blog post that I wrote for OpenDemocracy.net. Last April, we looked on with horror at images of Rana […]

The Economist’s Pride

by Enia Dellepiane Hong Kong, London, New York – The objective of The Economist’s March 3rd event, ‘Pride and Prejudice: The business case for LGBT diversity and inclusion,’ was clear and self-explanatory.  Representatives of major global businesses and development institutions gathered to raise awareness, analyse, and (ideally) commit to LGBT inclusiveness. Over a 24-hour period, […]