Category Anthropology

Review: Crumpled Paper Boat

By Fawzia Haeri Mazanderani ***Originally published in LSE Review of Books*** Writer James Agee, when commissioned to bring back an enticing story for Fortune magazine about impoverished farmers in the US South during the Great Depression, expressed a desire to ‘tear up a clump of earth with a hoe, put that on a page and […]

Citizen aid – and why ordinary people are founding their own development projects

By Anne-Meike Fechter At the height of the European refugee crisis, volunteers delivered goods to makeshift camps in Calais, set up soup kitchens, and helped recent arrivals on the Greek island of Lesvos. But such grassroots humanitarianism does not always play out on Europe’s doorstep. “Citizen aid” – whereby driven individuals set up their own, […]

Review: The Anthropology of Corporate Social Responsibility

By Deniz Seebacher **Originally published on Anthropology Matters, 17(2)** Corporations, an omnipresent form of organisation in today’s society, are increasingly called to participate in tackling environmental and social issues such as climate change or refugee crises by ‘taking responsibility’ and supporting governments and civil society. The corporate social responsibility (CSR) movement can be seen as […]

From the Field: Herat

Notes from the Field: Regional Connectivity as a Site for the Ethnography of Diplomacy, Afghanistan 6/10/16 – 6/11/16 was originally published on the University of Copenhagen’s Asian Dynamics Blog. by Magnus Marsden During this last year of research I have had the opportunity of attending a number of most thought provoking meetings. I have been able […]

The Power of a Story: I, Daniel Blake

by Tim Perkin I am no avid film fan. I can barely sit through an entire episode of Breaking Bad or Homeland let alone a whole film. But my experience of I, Daniel Blake was very different. I was fixed to my seat, my eyes glued to the screen in front of me, immersed in […]

On capitalist utopia and the rightful share

by Deniz Seebacher & Julia Büchele The title of James Ferguson’s latest book (2015) draws from (arguably) “the world’s most widely circulated development cliché”: Give a man a fish, and you feed him for a day. Teach a man to fish, and you feed him for a lifetime. Contrary to the widespread assumption that most of […]

Are explorers the descendants of our past?

by Kevin Karaca As a climber I am fascinated by the wilderness: great empty canyons or vast tundras worthy of expedition, steep tall cliff faces ready to climb. These hinterlands seem like they have always been like this, ever desolate. Given that we can hardly live here ourselves with all the insulation and technology to […]