by Rebecca Prentice, Hannah Amey, Maeve Devers, Rifka Fehr, Olive Howland Milne, Alfred Lewis, Phoebe Marsh, Joana Pereira and Amelia Yates As eight first-year anthropology students and one lecturer at the University of Sussex, we are doing a ‘fashion fast’ between now and Easter. This means we commit to wearing only 6 items of clothing for 6 weeks, […]

by Colin Gill In this moment in history we are witnessing several ultra-right movements across the globe. The most recent example of this is the election of president Jair Bolsonaro in Brazil. Bolsonaro has been speaking out and actively working against indigenous land sovereignty, making racist claims against Afro-Brazilians, hindering LGBTQ+ rights, and is willing […]

by Silvia Irina Berástegui In October of 2011, The Economist published an article called “More Anthropologists on Wall Street Please” in which the author, one ‘M.S.’, responded to a declaration by the Governor of Florida, Rick Scott, that funding for liberal-arts disciplines in American state universities should be reduced and given instead to the sciences. Governor […]

by Jonny Craig Last week the New England Patriots faced off against the Los Angeles Rams in Super Bowl 53. At this, the culmination of the NFL season, five-time winners, the Patriots, carried the tag of overwhelming favourites, having reached the final in nine of the last twenty seasons. Having paid no attention to the […]

by Melissa Geere Lewes, a small town just ten minutes from the University of Sussex, makes headlines every November for its famous Bonfire celebrations. In 2018, the headlines were not entirely positive when a photo of a child in a shop window sparked scandal during the lead-up to the event. The child was participating in the Lewes Bonfire […]

by Silvia Irina Berástegui I arrived in Brighton 5 years ago with the dream of finding a good job and starting an autonomous life of my own. During these years, Brighton has given me lots of great friends, experiences and adventures but, most importantly, it has also changed the way I live my life and […]

by Kazuki Horiuchi Non-western countries, such as China and India, have become in the last decades major actors of international development (Madwsley 2013). Yet, distinguishing between traditional and emerging donors, might be an over-simplified dichotomy, as donors are not unified in their purposes, and their policies have changed considerably over the years (see Gu and […]

by Rebecca Prentice **Republished from The Conversation.** In the five years since the collapse of the Rana Plaza garment factory building in Bangladesh – in which more than 1,134 people lost their lives and hundreds were injured – a variety of strategies have been developed to improve labour conditions and prevent another such disaster. The most […]

by Gertrude Lamare It was June of 2015, and we were on the road, travelling down to Umwang village in Assam, to witness the completion of a much-delayed burial of a woman who had died a hundred years ago. She was a member of the Makdoh clan of the Khasi-Bhoi tribe. Umwang village technically fell […]

By Luke Walker Nothing is quite as ubiquitous as the body. Over the years, anthropology has dragged the body in all kinds of directions, thus making it a formidable epistemological concern in its own right. Once regarded as an implicit taken for granted feature of social life, the body is now what anthropologists use to […]