Category Precariousness

Deliveroo Riders Aren’t Workers, Says London Tribunal

by Rebecca Prentice In a surprise setback for trade unions attempting to organise the ‘gig’ economy, a London tribunal has ruled that Deliveroo riders are self-employed contractors, not ‘workers.’ This means that the riders do not have basic rights to minimum wage, holiday pay, and health and safety protections. They also have no right to […]

Agency, Upkeep, and Neglect in North Carolina Farm Labor Camps

by Bennett Heine In a recent article in Human Organization, co-authors Thomas Arcury, Sarah Quandt, and I draw from interviews with migrant farmworkers to conclude that agency matters. It matters for the day-to-day material well-being and dignity of farmworkers and their families; for researchers looking to situate the lives and struggles of migrant farmworkers within […]

When buildings burn, from London to Dhaka

by Rebecca Prentice There is for me a sad familiarity in the story of the Grenfell Tower fire. I have spent recent years researching garment factory fires and collapses in Bangladesh. Large-scale fires, no matter where they are, have a recursive quality to them. There is always the story of the spark that begins it, […]

Precarity as Freedom? Youth, Neoliberalism and the Dissolution of ‘Japan, Inc.’

by Shuto Fukuoka It would not be an overstatement to say that the Japanese youth of today are significantly foreign to the one a couple of decades ago, in relation to their lives, values, and consciousness. Throughout the post-war period, and particularly the past two decades, Japan witnessed dramatic socioeconomic transformation. Japanese society was founded […]

The Power of a Story: I, Daniel Blake

by Tim Perkin I am no avid film fan. I can barely sit through an entire episode of Breaking Bad or Homeland let alone a whole film. But my experience of I, Daniel Blake was very different. I was fixed to my seat, my eyes glued to the screen in front of me, immersed in […]