Category Education

Widening the lens: English teaching volunteering

by Ruthie Walters Overseas volunteering has received a lot of attention in academia, in the media and on social media. Yet, the focus tends to be on the volunteer, often from the Global North, whilst the communities visited are referred to as ‘the voluntoured’, ‘recipients’ or simply ‘host communities’. As a result, I was often left wondering about […]

‘We’re Not Allowed to be Girls!’ Resisting Gender-Neutral Uniform

by Anne-Meike Fechter For those unfamiliar with the issue, the news that a group of parents and pupils at an East Sussex secondary school staged a protest on the first day of term against the final-stage roll-out of a gender neutral uniform, may seem bemusing. Why would girls, and their parents, actively resist a policy that […]

Desperately Seeking Futurity: Precarity and the Desire(s) of Higher Education Participation

by Matthew Clark Discourses on graduate employability have increasingly gained a prominent position in higher education (HE). Although a bemoaned topic for many and a source of melancholic longing for an educational era perceived to be bygone, graduate employability has come to be framed by successive governments as the core purpose of HE, and the […]

A Rise in Vulnerability? Academic Studies, Paid Work and Mental Health

**This is the second of three posts on student experience, debt and austerity in higher education; see post published on October 8th.** by Anne-Meike Fechter In the last few years, a slew of reports voiced concerns about a rise of mental health problems among university students, in the UK and elsewhere. While there is debate about […]

How Does the Necessity of Paid Work Impact Our Students?: Learning from the Global Studies Student Employment Survey

by Paul Robert Gilbert **This is the first of three posts on student experience, debt and austerity in higher education; the second post was published on October 15th.** There is little more grating, for those of us who work in Higher Education, than those portions of the British media who insist on propagating lazy stereotypes of ‘work-shy […]